Integrative Climate Change Biology

iCCB workshop participants

This event brought together paleontologists, ecologists, and quantitative biologists. They discussed how data from paleontology, modern ecology, and conservation biology can be integrated to provide a comprehensive framework for monitoring and measuring ecosystem structure and function through space and time to determine how climate has changed over time.

Since 2015, AUC has benefited from the Integrative Climate Change Biology (iCCB), a programme of IUBS to build capacity among African scientists. Recently a SYMPOSIUM AND WORKSHOP was organised between MARCH 6TH -8TH , 2017 at NATIONAL MUSEUMS OF KENYA, NAIROBI. The workshop focused on the "TRAITS PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE".

The workshop consisted academia, curators, heads of departments of museums, researchers, NGO/CSOs, both from north and south countries representatives. This is the first workshop to be organized in the region. The workshop was organized by the following iCCB team;

Dr. Jason J. Head (PhD)
University Lecturer and Curator of Vertebrate Palaeontology
Department of Zoology & University Museum of Zoology
Downing St. University of Cambridge

Prof. Dr. Johannes Müller

Museum für Naturkunde
Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und

Biodiversitätsforschung
Invalidenstraße 43, 10115 Berlin
Deutschland

Dr. Fredrick Kyalo Manthi

Dept. of Earth Sciences,

National Museum of Kenya,

Raymond Katebaka

A conservation biologist in Africa

African Union of Conservationists (AUC)

Main themes in this projects include:

  • JOINING THE PAST, PRESENT, & FUTURE THROUGH FUNCTIONAL TRAITS.
  • BUILDING AN ECOMETRIC WITH MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION.
  • EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS OF ECOMORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS.
  • USING NICHE DYNAMICS & PALEONTOLOGICAL MOVEMENT PATTERNS TO INTERPRET THE FAILINGS OF SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELS (AND IMPROVE THEM).

  • LARGE MAMMALS IN SPACE & TIME: DIVERSITY DYNAMICS & BODY SIZE EVOLUTION OVER 20 MILLION YEARS.

  • DIET AND DENTAL MORPHOLOGY TRAITS AS PROXIES FOR PALEOECOLOGY & MACROEVOLUTION.
  • RUNNING HOT: WHAT CARNIVORE MORPHOLOGY CAN TELL US ABOUT CLIMATE.